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fall

Buying a Home in the Fall

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Real Estate and the Presidential Election

Mar

MAR Conference in Foxwoods Casino, Connecticut

                      MAR  2016 MAR Conference &                                            Tradeshow

                                         October 5 & 6, 2016
Foxwoods, CT

Join MAR at this year’s Conference & Tradeshow at the Foxwoods Resort Casino for two full days of education sessions with top national speakers. Network with fellow Realtors®, get to know vendors that can help your business and much more at the largest industry conference in New England.
Hotel Information:
Foxwoods Resort Casino

350 Trolley Line Boulevard,
Mashantucket, CT 06338-3777
1-800-369-9663

BOLD Moves Real Estate of Mattapoisett, MA will be in attendance at the conference and tradeshow.

Broker owner Kate Lanagan MacGregor of BOLD Moves along with Linda Kody  will be presenting “Seller Agency for Today and Tomorrow:  Coming Soon Upstream to a Pocket Near You”  tomorrow, Thursday at 8:30 AM.

Don’t miss this great educational opportunity. This evolving continuing education class incorporates MLSPIN guidelines, the Code of Ethics, and NAR’s Upstream initiatives into practicing real estate today.  Some of the topics include how to appropriately handle “coming soon” and exclusive listings.

Kate was excited to work with Kathy Condon and John Breault from MLSPIN and their expertise as well as Veronica McManus from RPR and Alex Lang- CEO of Upstream.  They really  provided her with a wealth of knowledge in their areas of expertise.

It’s not too late to check out the conference and put on your calendar for tomorrow’s events.  We will have more information on the conference and highlights in the days to come.

Stay tuned to www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more information and great real estate in your area.

Visit www.agentrising.com to start your real estate career with Agent Rising Real Estate School.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on October 5, 2016.

 

5 Things Prospects Can’t Say No To

Fall Landscaping Maintenance Tips

Landscape Maintenance Tips for the Fall Season

fall landscapeFall.  When the morning air turns crisp and cool and the leaves begin to float softly to the ground.  Not only is it my favorite season, there are many maintenance tasks to be accomplished in the landscape.  The info below includes tips on what I have found are the most important and useful tasks-  so get out there, have fun with it, and enjoy the autumn weather!

Key Dates

  • Early October:  It is a good idea to winterize your irrigation system and blow out the lines.  Many landscape maintenance companies will provide this service for less than $50, or it is pretty simple to do it yourself.
  • October 15th:  Don’t plant any grasses or perennials after this date.  Many of them won’t survive, and you will have much better luck in the spring.
  • November 1st:  Don’t plant any evergreens (especially trees) after this date.  Some deciduous trees and large deciduous shrubs can be planted later if they are balled and burlapped (B&B), but I would recommend waiting until spring when you’ll have much better success.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Prune trees and shrubs to remove dead branches or to control their size.  Fall is the best time to do this for the health of the plants.  Consider consulting with an arborist before any major pruning on trees, or at least do a little research on techniques.  When pruning shrubs, always try to maintain the natural size and growth habit of the species-  Avoid over-pruning or sculpting unnatural shapes, unless you are creating a specific look such as a hedge.  Instead of using power shears to lap off shrubs on a straight line, consider using hand pruners to thin the interior branches to maintain a healthier more natural look.
  • Remember to check soil moisture, and water if needed.  Even though you may have your irrigation system shut down for the year, fall often brings some warm, windy days that can really dry things out.  Pay special attention to anything that was just planted this year.
  • Make sure you have plenty of mulch around trees and shrubs-  this helps maintain moisture and keeps the soil from drying out over the winter.

Perennials and Ornamental Grasses

  • Prepare tender and semi-hardy perennials and shrubs for the upcoming cold winter.  I like to let a few of the fallen leaves that tend to build up around the bases of these plants remain there for the winter-  they will provide insulation around the base of the plant from the cold.  This also saves you some leaf cleanup now that you can do in the early spring.  If necessary, place additional wood mulch around the base of these plants for more insulation- pay particular attention to areas with northern exposure.
  • Leave spent stems and seed heads on grasses and perennials until spring, to enjoy their winter beauty and to provide cover for birds and wildlife.  Or, if you must have a neater look you can cut them back now, to a height of about 6-8″ off of the ground.
  • Dividing:  Some plants can be divided in the fall and replanted in other areas.  Other species don’t like the fall division/planting though, and I think that spring is a much better time to do it.  If you decide to divide, remember to water the plants well for a couple of weeks.

Lawns

  • Rake those leaves!  If left on the lawn they can smother it and cause issues such as mold and fungus.
  • Consider aerating your lawn.  Aeration allows greater movement of water, fertilizer, and air which stimulates healthy turf.  Aerating also increases the speed of decomposition of the grass clippings and enhances deep root growth.  Compacted soil especially benefits from core aerating.
  • You may want to fertilize your lawn or use a “weed and feed” type light pre-emergent herbicide in the fall for maximum growth the following spring.  Don’t over do it though, because fertilizer and herbicide can wash off of your lawn and the runoff can be harmful to water supplies and wildlife.
  • Assess the size and configuration of your lawn, and how much water you used this year to keep it green (or, brown?).   Consult with a landscape architect about how you can redesign your landscape to make it more attractive, sustainable, and functional.

Fall Weather Considerations

  • The days are getting shorter and the weather is getting cooler.  Keep an eye on the amount of precipitation we are getting-  Fall can have extremes of hot and cold, dry and wet.  Be observant.  If you have heavy rain for a couple of days then turn off the sprinklers for a week or so to compensate.  And if you have several days of warm, sunny weather then your landscape will certainly appreciate an extra drink.

Other

  • Disconnect and drain hoses, but keep a hose handy for winter watering.  I also like to wrap insulation or put insulated covers over the exterior faucets as an added protection from freeze damage (I once had a pipe freeze and break UNDER my porch, and had to take apart the porch to fix it!).
  • Collecting seed:  Stop deadheading late in the year and allow the seedheads to dry on the plant.  Then you can collect the dried seeds to plant next spring.  Store them in a cool, dark place in a container that does NOT have an airtight seal, such as an envelope (it’s also a good idea to label the container so you remember what plant it is next spring).  Another option- leave the seeds on the plants and some perennials will re-seed themselves naturally.
  • Start planning your spring bulb garden now.  Spring-blooming bulbs are planted in the fall to provide the chilling time required for spring blooms.  Remember to prepare the soil and plant bulbs at the appropriate depth listed on the package for the species.
  • Start planning for design changes to your landscape for next year.  Fall and winter are the best times to get your plans in order, and spring is the best time to install the changes-  so get ready early for next spring, because it will be here before you know it!
  • Take a break and toss the football around.  Afterward, enjoy some warm apple cider with cinnamon.  Finally, rake your leaves into a giant pile and take turns jumping into them with the neighbor kids!

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for all your real estate needs.  We have our own home stager, Laura Severino, who can help stage your home and help your house sell faster.

Visit www.agentrising.com to start your real estate career.  Classes are enrolling now.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on September 21, 2016.

housing forecast

Housing Forecast- Two Years of Growth 2016-2017

Housing Forecast 2016-2017: Two Years Of Growth

I connect the dots between the economy and business decisions.

More housing units are being occupied, and that dictates a strengthening market in 2016. Higher mortgage rates will eventually take their toll, but we’re 18 to 24 months away from that. In 2016 and 2017, housing construction will increase and home prices will rise.

The number of housing units actually occupied has increased by two million units over the past four quarters (which I highlighted in my recent economics newsletter, free to my best friends). We only built 1.1 million new units, so the additional 900,000 units occupied came from previously-vacant housing.

Housing Occupancy

The housing occupancy data (Table 8) come from a survey that isn’t perfect, but it’s good enough to tell us that we are underbuilding housing right now. The new occupancy comes partly from population growth, but that only accounts for half the increased demand. The other half comes from adult children moving out of their parents’ basements, singles living without roommates now, and couples getting divorced. This pool of people setting up new households isn’t large enough for many years of growth, but it’s good enough for a year or two.

Mortgage interest rates will rise, partly due to the Federal Reserve’s tightening and partly because global demand for credit will increase faster than global supply of savings. Historical patterns show that in the first and sometimes second year of rising mortgage rates, housing starts continue to rise, fueled by strong economic growth. Eventually, though, higher interest rates prevent further improvement in the housing market, and sometimes a contraction. So long as new construction isn’t overdone in 2016, I expect a leveling off in late 2017 and 2018, not an outright decline.

Home prices should reflect this trend: up for 18 to 24 months, then flat for a year or two.

Visit www.forbes.com for more information on this article.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for local realtors who are experts in the communities they serve.

Agent Rising Real Estate School Starting New Classes

workshop_sm

Agent Rising Real Estate School helps you reach your dreams! Are you ready for a change of career?  Did you always dream of being a real estate agent?  Now is the time to put those dreams into reality! Agent Rising Real Estate School is starting new workshops September 8th at the BOLD Welcome Center on Fairhaven Rd. in Mattapoisett. Times don’t work? We will help you with independent office hours!

Join Kate Lanagan MacGregor, Dawn Devlin and Marie Greany as they help you through the process of becoming a real estate agent.

Classes are held Monday and Thursday from 5-8 pm.  Join our seasoned pros in helping you obtain your real estate license and get started on a great career.

It’s not too late to enroll.  Call Marie at 508-207-3186.   Visit www.agentrising.com for more information.

landscaping and watering

Landscaping and Watering

landscaping and wateringSummer is an especially important time to save water. Outdoor water use increases residential consumption from 10% to 50% in June, July and August.  This summer has been a particularly difficult year with significantly less than average rainfall and the need to water more frequently.  Every drop counts to keep your landscaping alive and flourishing.

TIMING IS CRITICAL!

Watering your lawn mid-day will result in a high rate of evaporation and sunburned grass. Roots can maintain plenty of moisture even after several days without rain. Before watering, look for signs that it’s needed: patchy areas, a general change in color or footprints that remain in the grass long after being made.

Frequent light watering can actually weaken your lawn by encouraging shallow roots that are less tolerant of dry periods and more susceptible to insect damage. Wet grass can also burn in the hot sun and is vulnerable to disease from mildew and fungus. Test your soil for dryness by digging your finger below the surface of the soil. Water only when the soil is dry to a depth of 1 1/2 inches. When watering, check to see that water soaks down 3-4 inches. This encourages deep root growth.

GIVE YOUR LAWN A REST

If your lawn “fades” in the summer, don’t panic. Grass becomes naturally dormant during hot, dry periods. It will revive quickly after a good rainfall or when the weather turns cooler.

  • Water very early in the morning.
  • Never water when it’s windy, rainy or very hot.
  • Raise the blade level of your mower to 2 -3 inches or more. Longer grass retains more moisture because it shades the roots. It encourages deeper rooting, requires less fertilizer and competes better against weeds.
  • Never water faster than the soil can absorb it. Avoid puddling and run-off.
  • Be sure your hose has a shut-off nozzle. Hoses without a nozzle can spout 10 gallons or more per minute.
  • If you have an automatic sprinkler system, make sure the timer or “controller” is set to water each landscape zone efficiently. Program the controller to operate according to the watering needs of your lawn or garden. Better still, install a rain sensor or soil moisture sensor that turns the system off if it’s raining or if moisture is present in the soil.
  • Do not apply fertilizer in the summer – new growth requires more water. Apply in early spring and or fall.
  • Aerate your soil in April, September or October to aid water absorption and retention.

PLAN AND DESIGN YOUR GARDEN FOR EFFICIENT WATERING

Be aware of the various zones in your yard (hot/sunny, cool/shady, moist, dry, etc.) and plan your gardens and plantings accordingly. For example, if your have a hot, dry zone, carefully select plants that can endure hot, dry conditions.

CLUSTER PLANTS THAT NEED EXTRA CARE

If you choose shrubs, flowers or vegetables that need lots of sun and moisture, place them near each other. You’ll save time and water by watering just one area of your yard.

MULCH TO KEEP ROOTS MOIST

Mulch can serve as a ground cover that reduces water evaporation from the soil and reduces the number of weeds that would otherwise compete with the plant for available soil moisture.

Mulch flowers, shrub beds and trees with pine bark mulch. In your vegetable beds, use salt marsh hay, newspaper (no color pages), black plastic, or better yet, landscape fabric – that allows water to penetrate the fabric but keeps down weed growth. On a sweltering 100° day, a 3-inch mulch can keep the soil underneath up to 25° cooler! Avoid white marble chips that can damage acid-loving plants like rhododendrons. Stones or pebbles are good on shady areas. They shouldn’t be used near the house because they give off too much heat. Ground covers, such as ivy or pachysandra, also prevent evaporation around established shrubs and ornamental trees

.You can’t control the weather but you can do  your part to make the most of the water available tohelp keep your  landscaping alive.

Visit www.agentrising.com for more useful tips to pass on to your real estate clients or to start your real estate career with Agent Rising Real Estate School.

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